Start Validating social security number javascript

Validating social security number javascript

Once the client and server have agreed to use TLS, they negotiate a stateful connection by using a handshaking procedure.

TLS supports many different methods for exchanging keys, encrypting data, and authenticating message integrity (see Algorithm below).

Version 1.0 was never publicly released because of serious security flaws in the protocol; version 2.0, released in February 1995, "contained a number of security flaws which ultimately led to the design of SSL version 3.0".

Released in 1996, SSL version 3.0 represented a complete redesign of the protocol produced by Paul Kocher working with Netscape engineers Phil Karlton and Alan Freier, with a reference implementation by Christopher Allen and Tim Dierks of Consensus Development. The 1996 draft of SSL 3.0 was published by IETF as a historical document in RFC 6101. Taher Elgamal, chief scientist at Netscape Communications from 1995 to 1998, is recognized as the "father of SSL".

Transport Layer Security (TLS) and its predecessor, Secure Sockets Layer (SSL), both frequently referred to as "SSL", are cryptographic protocols that provide communications security over a computer network.

Several versions of the protocols find widespread use in applications such as web browsing, email, Internet faxing, instant messaging, and voice-over-IP (Vo IP).

It builds on the earlier SSL specifications (1994, 1995, 1996) developed by Netscape Communications Client-server applications use the TLS protocol to communicate across a network in a way designed to prevent eavesdropping and tampering.

Since applications can communicate either with or without TLS (or SSL), it is necessary for the client to indicate to the server the setup of a TLS connection.

Among the methods used for key exchange/agreement are: public and private keys generated with RSA (denoted TLS_RSA in the TLS handshake protocol), Diffie-Hellman (TLS_DH), ephemeral Diffie-Hellman (TLS_DHE), Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman (TLS_ECDH), ephemeral Elliptic Curve Diffie-Hellman (TLS_ECDHE), anonymous Diffie-Hellman (TLS_DH_anon), The TLS_DH_anon and TLS_ECDH_anon key agreement methods do not authenticate the server or the user and hence are rarely used because those are vulnerable to Man-in-the-middle attack.